Do I have a claim against unauthorized inquiry on my credit report?

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Do I have a claim against unauthorized inquiry on my credit report?

I pulled my credit report a while back and noticed that I have a hard inquiry from a cell phone company. I never wanted this company’s service. I wouldn’t have no reason to seek service from them. I received a letter from them saying that I was declined for their service. At the time, I did not understand why I was even getting the letter, since I never applied. I dismissed the concern at the time, however, now I noticed that there is a law against unauthorized inquiries. Do I have a claim?

Asked on November 8, 2010 under Bankruptcy Law, Washington

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

An unauthorized inquiry is just what it states: when somebody tries to access your report without your consent.  These inquiries can have the worst effect on credit scores.  Thus, they should be taken seriously. If somebody tries to get inquiry of your account you can write to the authorities asking for a proof. If they are unable to provide results you can post a conflict. You can even sue the company in case they are not able to provide you with proofs. All you have to do is make three copies of a dispute letter and mail it to all the credit reporting agencies. Then the authorities will need to act accordingly, inquire the lender and let you know about all the details. In case the authorities fail to send to a complete report (called as 'willful noncompliance), they are in trouble.  You would have to make sure that you have proof that this inquiry did something to lower your report.  Do you have a copy of your credit report before you revcievd the letter declining service?  You will need to seek help here but the most inplrtant thing to do is to start to get the stain off your report.  Good luck.


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