Do I get paperwork when I return a car to a dealership?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Do I get paperwork when I return a car to a dealership?

I recently returned a car that turned out to be possibly in a flood and the dealer just gave me my money back and said there was no paper work and the leases had been cancelled. Should I get at least something or the old contract.

Asked on February 22, 2011 under General Practice, Arizona

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In addition to the sound advice above, I would go back to the dealer that you turned it in to  - the person specifically that you turned it in to - and askhim or her to sign a receipt of some sort indicating that you turned it in to him and the keys to the vehicle on such and such a date and at such and such a time.  And write something on it like: pursuant to our previous discussions, etc.   What really do you have to lose?  I would also make sure that you contact whomever financed the vehicle as well just to be sure of things.  And why don't you have copies of all the documents here?  Good luck.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You *should* get something in writing; unfortunately, there is nothing requiring a merchant or vendor to provide written confirmation of transactions, including this type of transaction. The best you can do may be to send a note--it can be very cordial and pleasant--by two or three ways that you can prove delivery (e.g. by email; by fax; by fed ex or certified mail, return receipt requested) in which you memorandize your undersanding of the transaction and that the lease has been cancelled and requesting that if this is not the dealer's understanding, that the dealer please state its understandinig of the transaction. If they don't reply, you can use their failure to reply as evidence that your understanding was correct.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption