Do I deserve any severance if I was let go for no reason?

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Do I deserve any severance if I was let go for no reason?

I was hired 5 months ago as a pharmacy technician. I was to mix chemotherapy drugs and also to help get an oral dispensing program started. The program was to start last month. They kept saying they didn’t know what company they were going with. About 3 weeks ago one of the doctors stopped to talk with me and told me to study the oral meds whenever I had downtime. A few days later, one of the nurses came to me and said that I couldn’t just stand around but I was actually studying at the time. She told me to go to the office and file. Then the next week I went to talk to the nursing supervisor to say that I was getting mixed signals and ask her what I should be doing. She said she would talk to the nurses and see if there was some things they could give me to do in my downtime. About 10 days ago I was brought into the office and told they were eliminating my position; 2 days later I called back to see if my benefits would continue for a while and was told no that they ended on the day they let me go. I was also told a different reason for them letting me go. I was not given any termination letter or any information on benefits. I did receive COBRA info about a week later. I’m just wondering if this is all legal or if there is anything I should pursue? I would like to have some kind of benefits until I can find another job and receive benefits.

Asked on February 11, 2017 under Employment Labor Law, Illinois

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

First of all, most employment is "at will" which means that an employee can be terminated for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice. Additionally, severance is not legally mandated so a company need not pay it. Accordingly, unless you have a union agreement or employment contract that provides otherwise, you are not entitled to severance or anything else for that matter. Bottom line, absent actionable discrimination, a company can set the conditions of employment much as it sees fit.

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

First of all, most employment is "at will" which means that an employee can be terminated for any reason or no reason at all, with or without notice. Additionally, severance is not legally mandated so a company need not pay it. Accordingly, unless you have a union agreement or employment contract that provides otherwise, you are not entitled to severance or anything else for that matter. Bottom line, absent actionable discrimination, a company can set the conditions of employment much as it sees fit.


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