Do I automatically qualify for continued unemployment if I have been actively seeking full-time employment while continuing to work part-time?

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Do I automatically qualify for continued unemployment if I have been actively seeking full-time employment while continuing to work part-time?

I received separation notice from full-time employment 5 months ago. I was approved for unemployment compensation. I was also working a part time job (12 hours per week) at the time of separation. I continued to work part time while actively seeking full time employment and I certified each week, reporting my part time income and received partial unemployment as a result. My regular unemployment has now been depleted and I thought for sure I would qualify for Emergency or 1st Tier unemployment. However, I have had to file appeal and now have had hearing. Am awaiting answer.

Asked on September 3, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You do not necessary qualify for continued unemployment, especially if your state limits the the length of time you can be on it, emergency or otherwise. It was up to you during your appeal to show why you should have continued unemployment and to show that your part time work was and is simply insufficient to sustain you. In the interim, while you are waiting for results, keep applying at jobs and make sure you show the agency that you are trying to look for full time work. If your appeal is denied, contact the appeal board and keep providing written proof you applied and then contact a labor lawyer who handles unemployment compensation appeals.


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