If detectives told me over the phone that they have probable cause to arrest me andthat Ineed to turn myself in, should I?

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If detectives told me over the phone that they have probable cause to arrest me andthat Ineed to turn myself in, should I?

I asked what I’m being charged with and they said “We can’t say over the phone only in person”. So I asked if there is a warrant for my arrest they said “We can’t say over phone only in person”. They came to my house 3 days in a row looking for me (I was not staying there at the time of course). It’s been over a week now and they haven’t been back since. Should I continue to hide out or turn myself in? If I turn myself in won’t that make me look guilty? Do I need to speak with a criminal defense attoreny? In Seatlle, WA.

Asked on July 12, 2010 under Criminal Law, Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 11 years ago | Contributor

Get a criminal defense attorney to advise and represent you--NOW. An attorney can advise you on how to respond to this situation; and if it's appropriate to turn yourself in, he or she can help make the arrangements and negotiate any details or logistics with the police on your behalf. In the meantime, do not say anything to anyone connected with either the police or prosecutors office--anything you say can and will be used against you. (Remember: under the Fifth Amendment, you have an absolute right to not incriminate yourself, which is usually called the "right to remain silent.")

Whenever the police are trying to contact you, you should get legal representation. Good luck.

 


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