What is my recourse if a dealership put rotors on my car that are to small?

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What is my recourse if a dealership put rotors on my car that are to small?

I bought a car from a dealership and had performance wheels put on. When my breaks started making noise I took it in to the same dealership. They told me the rotors were glazed and needed to be machined. I paid $210 to get the rotors machined. When my breaks started making noise again, I took it back to the same dealership. I told that my rotors were glazed again and it would be another $210 (didn’t pay). When I pulled off the wheels later I found that the break pads where hanging off the rotors because the rotors were to small. The dealership doesn’t believe me.

Asked on July 20, 2011 Washington

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

You can sue the dealership, for the cost of the repairs done to date and the cost of any further work required. When someone negligently, or through unreasonable carelessness, causes damage to your property, they may become liable, or leally obligated to pay, for the damage caused. Putting the wrong rotors onto the wheels could easily be negligence. In a court of law, you could testify, present evidence, cross-examine someone from the dealership, etc. to try to prove your case. You may wish to consider bringing the suit in small claims court, where you could represent yourself and spare yourself the cost of an attorney, which could make it cost effective to bring the lawsuit. Unfortunately, there is no way other than a lawsuit to try to get the money you believe you are owed.


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