Is a tenant liable for dead grass if they were unable to do anything about it due to soil, weather andrelated conditions?

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Is a tenant liable for dead grass if they were unable to do anything about it due to soil, weather andrelated conditions?

House I am leaving has patchy grass areas both front and back due to poor soil that won’t hold sustained grass growth; I’ve watered 2 – 6 times weekly depending on rainfall with a timed sprinkler system; I even re-seeded certain areas twice but grass won’t grow there (only weeds). Factor in spotty sprinkler flow (although I also tried hand watering). Care history is obvious in good soil spots. Lease specifies maintaining yard and plants, which I’ve done successfully, with this exception (even though there were 2 killing frosts this winter that torched several neighbors’ shrubs). How liable am I for this type of scenario?

Asked on July 25, 2011 Arizona

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

You need to read your lease about whose obligation if any there is to maintain the vegetation and lawn of the home you are renting. Its written terms on the subject would control on the subject you are asking about.

If you are making a diligent effort in watering the lawn regardless of whose obligation it is to maintain it, you should not be responsible for the dead grass that results through your own best efforts.

As a precaution, you should should contact your landlord about the grass problem despite your best efforts in keeping it watered and have a copy of a letter to your landlord on the subject for future reference.

Good luck.


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