Do I have to disclose my true finding on job applications?

True findings are often not considered convictions for employment purposes. Some states do not elevate a juvenile case to a criminal status until there is true finding. Even if you have a true finding, your state may prevent it from being used against you unless you were sentenced to a youth facility as a result of the true finding.

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Do I have the right to a jury trial in juvenile court?

In some states, such as Kansas and New Hampshire, juveniles have a right to a jury trial in juvenile court. These states’ constitutions, the 6th and 14th Amendment of the United States Constitution, and judicial interpretations of the state and federal constitutions provide juveniles with the right to a jury trial. If you are being charged as an adult in criminal court, the U.S. Constitution provides you with the right to a jury trial.

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As a minor, can I be transferred from juvenile court to adult court?

In most jurisdictions, the two ways in which a juvenile case can be tried in adult court are through the certification process (also known as the waiver or fitness process) or through automatic transfer. Based on factors ranging from the seriousness of the current charges to the juvenile’s age, if the judge decides there is probable cause justifying the district attorney’s request, the case will be transferred from juvenile court to adult court.

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