Out-of-State DUI Warrants

When you have multiple out-of-state DUI warrants, hire an attorney experienced in DUI matters. It’s not easy to predict what will happen when you have out-of-state DUI warrants as it depends on your personal criminal history. Especially if you have multiple DUI or DWI offenses on your record. It is in your best interest to take care of the DUI charge in your former state as soon as possible as it will become increasingly expensive and time-consuming.

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Avoiding a DUI Arrest: Critical First Steps

If the police officer asks you to step out of the car, comply. You don’t want to be charged with a criminal offense for obstructing justice as well as a drunk driving charge. At this point in the stop, the officer is only interested in collecting evidence against you to support an arrest and the criminal charge of DUI/DWI. The officer will ask/order you to perform what are known as standard field sobriety tests.

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Overview of Out-of-State DUIs

DUI’s are not limited to a person’s home state. When a DUI arrest occurs in a location you would rather not visit again, the temptation is to reason that you are never going back, so why worry about the out of state DUI arrest. Regardless of where you are from, the worst thing you can do is to ignore an out-of-state DUI arrest.

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What evidence is needed to arrest someone suspected of drunk driving?

Generally speaking, there are four types of evidence that a police officer will consider and gather in a drunk driving investigation: gross observations of behavior in general; specific observations of what are known as ‘field sobriety tests’ (FST); information obtained from questioning the suspect; and chemical test results of the motorist’s blood, breath or urine.

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Why am I being charged with both a DUI and driving with excessive blood alcohol content?

Originally, there were only two offenses a drunk driver could face: a DUI or a DWI. In recent years, however, a large majority of states have also enacted a second, so-called ‘per se’ offense: driving with an excessive BAC, or blood-alcohol concentration, which is set at 0.08% in all 50 states now. If you refuse a chemical test, only the traditional DWI/DUI offense will be charged because an officer is unable to accurately assess you blood alcohol content.

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DUI Bail and Bonds Overview

After an individual is arrested for a DUI offense, they will remain in jail until they are taken before a magistrate and arraigned. The general purpose of the magistration process is to advise you of the charges that have been filed against you and to set bond or a bail amount. The amount of your DUI bail and the procedures for making bond will depend on the criminal laws of the state in which you are arrested and the local rules of the county or parish.

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