How long must I stay in juvenile hall for a juvenile crime?

If you are a juvenile who is arrested and detained, your state’s laws and the juvenile court judge determine the length of your stay in juvenile hall. You may be allowed to leave juvenile hall after your first court appearance. A juvenile court judge may require you to stay in juvenile hall until after your trial or sentencing hearing. The seriousness of your juvenile crime charge, your behavior in juvenile court, and your actions in juvenile hall determine whether the juvenile court judge will release you from custody.

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Do I have to remain in juvenile hall until my case is concluded?

Whether or not you will be released from juvenile hall prior to the conclusion of your case will depend on where you live, since each state has developed its own procedures concerning the circumstances under which a juvenile can be kept in custody. In general, however, in most cases after being arrested, any juvenile in custody must be brought before a juvenile court authority such as a juvenile master, commissioner or judge, for a detention hearing within 24 hours of arrest.

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Am I entitled to bail out of juvenile hall like an adult can bail out of jail?

Unlike the adult criminal justice system, where the basic goals are to punish, deter, and maybe rehabilitate offenders, the main thrust of the juvenile justice system is to supervise, treat, and rehabilitate defendants to turn them from the criminal path before they become repeat adult offenders. Since this is the case, a juvenile does not have the right to a jury trial or the right to bail.

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How long can a juvenile be in detention for a juvenile crime?

When a juvenile is determined by a judge or jury to have committed a juvenile crime, the length of their sentence depends on the severity of their offense. A juvenile who is determined to have committed what would be a felony in adult court can spend years in a secure detention facility. State and federal rules regarding the length of a juvenile sentence vary widely.

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