What to do about a collection problem witha universitythatI dropped out ofmid-semester?

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What to do about a collection problem witha universitythatI dropped out ofmid-semester?

I entered into a contract with a university that forces students to pay by semester rather than by class as most other universities. At the end of ’09 I asked to drop out in the middle of the semester with the intent to re-enroll the following semester and pick up where I left off. They agreed to do this, however I never re-enrolled. So they are trying to charge me $4000 for what I did not finish plus $2000 in late/collection fees. I’ve tried to talk to them about this, but they won’t budge. Is there anything I can do legally to get out of this or am I out of luck?

Asked on February 4, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Ohio

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

There is probably nothing you can do about the $4,000 in tuition; you had an agreement to pay that and neither repaid it nor re-enrolled as per the agreement you subsequently made when you asked to leave mid semester.

As to the collection/late fees: you need to check the agreement(s) you had with the school; if they provided that you would have to pay late and/or collection costs if you defaulted on your payment, you will need to pay them per the agreement; though if the agreement specified you'd pay "reasonable" collection fees, you may have grounds to challenge the amount of fees if they are clearly excessive and thereby reduce them.


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