What to do if a collector says I owe money but my dad used my name and it’s really his debt?

Get Legal Help Today

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What to do if a collector says I owe money but my dad used my name and it’s really his debt?

I got a letter in the mail saying that I owe $45.50 in debt to a local newspaper. The debt collector claims that it is because I never paid on a subscription to that paper. Here’s the issue, my dad ordered that subscription. He claimed it was a birthday gift. He never paid whatever he owed on it. Instead he used my name and information to buy the subscription or whatever. He has done something like this to my uncle. Do I pay the debt? Do I tell the debt collector the story? Do I tell them what my dad did? Should I pursue legal action?

Asked on August 6, 2011 Florida

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, you need to speak with your father about his unauthorized use of your name and address to subscribe to a paper in your name. He has done this before to your uncle.  If he does not stop this wrongful conduct future unauthorized use of your name could be for something more substantial such as a credit card.

Your father needs to pay this $45.50 amount since he was the one who subscribed to the paper in your name. It is not your subscription. What your father did in a way could be considered a form of "identity theft" of you and your uncle in the past which is wrong bother from a civil,  but criminal aspect.

If your father refuses to pay the $45.50 debt, you are in an awkward position. Your father clearly did something wrong but refuses to pay the subscription which if not paid could impact your own credit rating in a negative way.

If your father refuses to pay the $45.50 amount, contact the debt collector and ask that the invoice be placed in your father's name after you tell what your father did, his unauthorized use of your name on the subscription application and see what happens.

In the end, you might have to pay the $45.50 amount. If you do, you need to be careful about your father in the future. He could cause you more problems well exceeding $45.50.

Good luck.

 

 

 

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

First, you need to speak with your father about his unauthorized use of your name and address to subscribe to a paper in your name. He has done this before to your uncle.  If he does not stop this wrongful conduct future unauthorized use of your name could be for something more substantial such as a credit card.

Your father needs to pay this $45.50 amount since he was the one who subscribed to the paper in your name. It is not your subscription. What your father did in a way could be considered a form of "identity theft" of you and your uncle in the past which is wrong bother from a civil,  but criminal aspect.

If your father refuses to pay the $45.50 debt, you are in an awkward position. Your father clearly did something wrong but refuses to pay the subscription which if not paid could impact your own credit rating in a negative way.

If your father refuses to pay the $45.50 amount, contact the debt collector and ask that the invoice be placed in your father's name after you tell what your father did, his unauthorized use of your name on the subscription application and see what happens.

In the end, you might have to pay the $45.50 amount. If you do, you need to be careful about your father in the future. He could cause you more problems well exceeding $45.50.

Good luck.

 

 

 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

secured lock Secured with SHA-256 Encryption