What happens if I am in collections for something I shouldn’t have been responsible for?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

What happens if I am in collections for something I shouldn’t have been responsible for?

I was a witness to a car accident and was billed for the ambulance. I fought it and thought everything was taken care of. I went the other day to apply for a car loan and have now received a collections letter for the bill amount, mind you the accident was over 3 years ago. So this is now effecting my credit. Do I have any recourse for getting this off my credit report and to get these people to just leave me alone?

Asked on July 25, 2011 Michigan

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Wait so you were just a witness and were instead billed for the ambulance call? Isn't that a kick in the teeth.  When you say that you thought that it was all taken care of what do you mean?  That you tried to straighted out the mess with the ambulanceservice? Here is what you need to do.  You have a right to dispute the charge with the credit bureaus and you should.  You have to write to each of them by certified mail, return receipt requested and dispute the reporting.  Th credit bureau must go back to the reporting creditor and ask them to verify the debt owed.  They have 30 days to do so.  If they do not then the information has to be taken off of your credit report.  Now, as for the collection agency, send them a copy of the letter you send to the credit bureau with documentation showing that the ambulance did not render services to you or anyone for whom you are financially responsible.  Call the bill collector first and ask for a supervisor.  Always better to get a name and actual address to send the info to.  Good luck. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption