Car shop ruined my car, can I sue?

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Car shop ruined my car, can I sue?

I took my car to Midas to get an check engine light checked. They didn’t fix it b/c they didn’t have the supplies in stock to fix it. While I was driving off, I realized the battery light was onfirst time I’ve seen it, I’ve had this car for 5 years. I asked the manager and he said he didn’t know why it was on but to drive it for a few to see if it goes away. It didn’t go away and on the next day the speedometer stopped working. A few hours later, the car won’t start. I got the vehicle towed which I of course had to pay for. Another service center said I need an alternator502, a new battery147 and valve cover casket77. This is just to start the car again. Then they have to find out why the speedometer doesn’t work I went to Midas with my car working and just an engine light on. I left w/ all those issues. Can I sue Midas and hold them liable?

Asked on June 9, 2016 under Business Law, Wisconsin

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

You can sue, BUT you have to be able to prove they caused the damage, such as with expert mechanic testimony that establishes that something the shop did caused the damage. The mere fact that the damage occured after they shop saw the car does not, by itself, proved that they caused the damage--it could be, for example, that you car was breaking down/failing (after all, there was a warning light on and you took it in for repairs) and it just happened to fail after the shop saw it. Unless you can prove they caused the problems, you will not be able to recover compensation from them.


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