If car repairs done without my approval, doI still have to pay?

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If car repairs done without my approval, doI still have to pay?

I brought my car in for repairs and was given this high estimate. Upon consulting with people Icalled them and specifically told them I just wanted an estimate for a partial repair. The gentleman said that he would get back in touch with me with the cost. Then a few days later they called and told me that my car was ready to be picked up and the bill was $1800. I did not sign any form of agreement to theses repairs nor did I authorize them to do so. Now  can not pay for these repairs. Am I obligated to pay this by law?

Asked on October 21, 2011 under General Practice, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you did not sign any document allowing the repairs to your vehicle which in fact were done by the automotive repair place and you also did not verbally authorize the repairs over the telephone, you are not responsible for the payment for the repairs.

I would first speak to the owner about the charges that you did not authorize and follow up the call with a written letter confirming the call keeping a copy for your records. Your state most likely has a bureau of automotive repairs that assists consumers like you with complaints about repair shops.

Most likely you are not responsible for the costs of the repairs that you did not authorize.

Good luck.

 


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