If a car auction messed up on a typo on the payment amount but I already paid for it and got it notarized, am I legally responsible to pay?

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If a car auction messed up on a typo on the payment amount but I already paid for it and got it notarized, am I legally responsible to pay?

I went to a public auto auction today and I bought a car for $440, plus the auctions price for buying which is $240. I signed a bill of sale and the title and it said I paid $680 for it. They are now saying that there was a typo and it was suppose to be $4,400. Am I legally responsible to pay that even though I signed a bill of sale and title and it was notarized by their people; I already have the car in my name? They said it was theft by deception even though I asked the clerk if that bill was correct and she said it was.

Asked on January 27, 2012 under Business Law, Kentucky

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you went to a public auction and you honestly thought you were buying a vehicle for the total out the door price of $680 where there seemingly is an error in the bill of sale where $4,400 is the correct amount, I do not see anything done wrong by you that could be deemed theft by deception if you had nothing to do with drafting the bill of sale or title documentation.

My concern is that how could there be such a discrepancy in the accepted bid amount that you believe you bid on and the amount the auction company says was the final bid? Did the auctioneer make a mistake in the numbers being called out? From what you have written, it seems as though you purchased a vehicle for $680 and no more at auction.


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