Can you get more then one charge expunged from your record?

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Can you get more then one charge expunged from your record?

I was charged 9 years ago with telephone harassment; 3 years ago I was charged with possession of marijuana which was dropped to disorderly conduct. Now these 2 charges are on my record. Can I get either of them expunged or both of them?

Asked on August 10, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Each state has their own laws regulating what offenses on your criminal record can be expunged.  All offenses have a waiting period, which is known as an “expungement waiting period.”  The length of time a person must wait before applying for expungement depends on the type of conviction or the manner in which the case ultimately was resolved.  The waiting period will not begin until the case has been terminated or finally discharged.  Typically a case is not deemed finally discharged until a person has served their entire sentence, completed any court-ordered probation, or paid any fines imposed by the court.  Once this final action has taken place, the court docket will be noted and the expungement waiting period can begin.

 

There are different waiting periods for felonies, misdemeanors, dismissed charges, and acquittals.  Depending on your state and the class in which your offenses are categorized will dictate when your record could be expunged.  For misdemeanors, you can apply for expungement and sealing of your record after one year of termination of the case.  For dismissed charges and acquittals, an individual can file for an expungement immediately.

 

There are attorneys who specialize not only in criminal defense law, but specifically in expungement.  Contacting one of these specialists may help you speed up the process and ensure that your record is properly expunged and sealed. 

 


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