Can you do anything if you notice your job posted for more money then you make now?

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Can you do anything if you notice your job posted for more money then you make now?

I work for a company that has bought a bunch of smaller companies throughout the last couple of years. I have requested a raises in the past and get the same answer, “We just don’t have money in out budget for your raise”. Even my boss agrees that I should get the raise. SinceI have been searching the internet for new jobs I noticed that another company that we have bought last year is offering my job at a different location for more money than I make now. This just doesn’t seem right. Is there a legal problems with this?

Asked on April 19, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

I'm afraid that no law is being broken here.  While unfair, it is legal.  An employer cannot only hire/fire employees as it deems necessary, it can also increase/decrease salary/hours, promote/demote, and generally impose requirements as it sees fit.  In turn, an employee can choose to work for their employer or not.  This is known as "at will" employment.  Accordingly, an employer cannot only hire/fire employees as it deems necessary, it can also increase/decrease salary/hours, promote/demote, and generally impose requirements as it sees fit.  In turn, an employee can choose to work for their employer or not.  Unless you have an employment contract or union agreement to the contrary or this situation is in direct conflict with existing company policy, you really have no rights here.  The exception being discrimination.  If you are being treated differently than others due to being in a protected class (such as for religion, race, gender, etc.) that would be illegal; however you do not indicate this to be the case.


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