can we file for ownership of grandparents home by being sole caretakers of the property

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can we file for ownership of grandparents home by being sole caretakers of the property

Me and my husband moved in his
grandparents home in 2005 there are three
properties on the land the grandparents
home which we live in our plot of land we
used to have a mobile home on his uncles
and his moms the deed has several
executors. The grandfather had it set up so no
one person was in control it was him the son
my husbands uncle his three daughters it is
set up to if one executor dies it goes to the
spouse then to the eldest child. When he died
the main executor became the eldest child
my husbands mom the secondary executors
were her two sister’s and brother. One sister
died and her secondary executor was passed
to her daughter my husbands cousin. So his
mom recently died which made my husband
the primary executor. The problem is the
uncle thinks cause he’s the only son it’s him
but he was not the eldest my husbands sister
is threatening to claim there moms house
cause she lived there and cared for her. We
have lived here since 2005 the house was
trashed and dilapidating and taxes were 4
years delinquent we have payed taxes on the
house and land all the houses sit on but the
other two houses they were responsible for
paying on the structures but we still pay the
tax on the 13 acres of lAnd and the original
home and trailer lot. H
When his mom died the taxes were 2 years
behind and again we payed them. Now at her
death the youngest sister is threatening to
take over but my husband is the primary
executor are there any possession laws
considering we pay taxes on all residences
while they live on it free of payments one
executor neither lives here or contributes they
have decision rights but no liability….the pther
two homes have decision rights live on the
land but contributes nothing now bullying my
husband cause he is primary executor

Asked on November 24, 2016 under Estate Planning, North Carolina

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

No, being the caretakers of a property do not give you any rights to it whatsoever--it does not qualify you for adverse possession, since being allowed to be there means the possession is permissioned, not "adverse" or hostile, and apart from adverse possession, the only way to get possession of real estate is to buy it (including at a foreclosure sale or auction or tax sale), be gifted it, inherit  it.


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