Can the commercial landlord require the tenant to install a vent to the outdoors for a clothes dryer

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Can the commercial landlord require the tenant to install a vent to the outdoors for a clothes dryer

The business was purchase in 2012. It had been operating in the space for
6 years prior.
After the purchase in 2012, the lease says that the space can only be used
for that particular business. The business operates a clothes dryer vented
to the indoors, as was the case in 2006.
Recently is has become known that the dryer is not vented properly per the
fire code. The landlord now wants the tenant to have a vent installed
through the roof the vent the dryer.
As a tenant I feel the building owner should pay for the vent. The owner
was aware of the intended use of the space, but did not mention that I
would eventually have to install a vent.

Asked on June 23, 2019 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

You are incorrect: the building owner or landlord does not need to pay the cost for you to be able to operate your business, so that you can make money. It does't matter that the landlord was aware of the intended use; a landlord has no obligation to ensure that the tenant can legally and safely operate his/her business or pay any costs or expenses associated with the tenant operating the business. It is the tenant's obligation to make sure that he or she can operate in that location. This is simply another cost you have to absorb, like you would absorb the cost of new equipment or machinery.


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