Can the apartment complex change the amount of the eviction after I’ve already paid?

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Can the apartment complex change the amount of the eviction after I’ve already paid?

I was evicted during a time of financial hardship, and moved out due to non-payment of rent. I contacted the apartment complex to find out what I need to pay to settle as I have 2 girls, and need a place to stay and I have some money saved. They advised me to wait on the paper for the security deposit disbursement. Weeks later I received the paper stating I needed to pay $685 + some change. A couple weeks after, I went to them with a $700 money order. They gave me a receipt and said I was good to go. Now 2 weeks later I get another security deposit disbursement stating that I owe $2000+ more.

Asked on August 25, 2011 Ohio

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Whether or not the apartment complex can change the amount that it claims you owe it for non-payment of rent and other amounts such as damages to the unit you were renting and other associated fees such as late fees, early termination fees, lost rent depends upon what the written lease that you presumably signed states.

You will need to carefully read the terms of your written lease with your landlord in that its written terms control the obligations you owe the landlord and vice versa in the absence of conflicting state law.

I suspect that one reason why the amount you owe the landlord has increased is because you were on a lease for a set term and each month you do not pay for the unit you agreed to rent (but are not occupying) is added to the amount from the previous month.

If there is a legal aid program in the county where you reside, you should consult with it to assist you in your matter.

Good luck.


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