Can our landlord enforce an eviction if we refuse to agree to pay the majority of the water bill?

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Can our landlord enforce an eviction if we refuse to agree to pay the majority of the water bill?

Our formal lease ended about 3 months ago and now we are month-to-month. No binding agreement. He expects us to pay 2/3 of the water bill. We have a much smaller unit, 1 less bathroom, and no dishwasher. Only 1 tenant upstairs but his unit is much larger, plus he has a dishwasher that he uses practically everyday. And again, there is only 1 water meter for these 2 rental units.

Asked on January 1, 2012 under Real Estate Law, North Carolina

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you are on a month-to-month rental your landlord could very well seek to evict you regarding the water bill issue that you have written about. Before matters come to such a possible situation, I suggest that you consult with your local building permit and resource department to see if it is even legal to rent out units in the community that you live in if there rentals do not have separate meters for water and other utilities.

My experience is that most municipalities require separate meters for all rentals to avoid the very problem that you are experiencing with the landlord where one occupant is charged far more than he or she should be charged due to one meter for multiple rentals.


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