Can one lawyer represent a divorcing couple?

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Can one lawyer represent a divorcing couple?

My wife and I are going through a divorce. She has a lawyer that I am paying for but I have no lawyer. We share a house that is in both our names and we have two children. She wants me to put the house in her name and also 2 cars and continue to pay for all the utilities, morgage and car payments. She wants me to pay for all expenses including health insurance for her. I feel this is not correct. I will pay 1500 dollars child support for 2 children however, what else should be paid?
With regards to the home is putting the house in her sole name a good idea and should I continue to pay for the morgage and ALL utilities?

Please help ASAP.

Asked on May 30, 2017 under Family Law, Alaska

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Make no mistake, even though you are paying for her attorney, she is not also representing you. If would be unethical for this arroeny to do so. She is your wife's attorney and has only her best interests at heart. You need to retain your own counsel; they can best represent your interests. And from the sound of things, the sooner you get your own lawyer, the better.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Retain your own lawyer and ask these questions to him/her. You need advice from someone who puts YOUR interests first. The questions you ask are very fact specific: the answers will vary with your and your wife's respective finances and jobs, how long you have been married, future earning potential, your age, age of children, the cost of living in your area and the lifestyle you had, value of your assets (e.g. home, cars, etc.), etc.; you need to go over all this in detail with an attorney to get a useful, appropriate answer.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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