Can my soon-to-be-ex keep up a no contact order between my boyfriend and my children after I am divorced?

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Can my soon-to-be-ex keep up a no contact order between my boyfriend and my children after I am divorced?

I am in the middle of a nasty divorce. My soon-to-be-ex had a no contact order placed between our minor children and my boyfriend. My boyfriend has an arrest record but no convictions; he was arrested twice in the last 15 yrars ( assault and battery and mayhem). These crimes were against other men (bar fights). He also has a DUI ( over 10 years ago) and 6 years ago had a restaining order put on him by a girlfriend. My ex just wants me not to be able to spend time with my boyfriend because he said so. He also knows that my boyfriend is not a danger to my children.

Asked on May 7, 2012 under Family Law, Massachusetts

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Potentially the "no contact" order that your soon to be "ex" spouse has in effect between your current boyfriend and your children/his children can remain in force even after you and he are divorced. Whether that happens remains to be seen and would be determined by the court based upon evidence presented by your soon to be former spouse and yourself.

The court will make the final decision as to the "no contact" order down the road. For further assistance concerning this matter, I suggest that you consult with a family law attorney.


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