Can my roommate move someone new in when our roommate addendum has a date of 5/30?

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Can my roommate move someone new in when our roommate addendum has a date of 5/30?

I lived in the state of TX as a student, after graduation my roommate wanted to keep our apartment. She found a roommate and we signed a roommate addendum dated 5/30 with the understanding that the new person could stay in the apartment on the couch until that date. When I went to get my boxes the new roommate had moved her items into my room without my permission. I have paid rent until my last day and I should have the right to stay in my apartment until my lease ends. In the interim my parent have moved me back to AZ early so that I can have a place to live. The apartment complex states there is nothing they can do. I feel at the least they should re-imburse me the last 10 days of rent. Is there anything I can do?

Asked on May 21, 2018 under Real Estate Law, Texas

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You had no obligation to move out if you were leasing the space through the end of the month, and the new rommmate had no right to move her belongings into your room. You had the legal right to stay there until your lease was up.
This is not an issue for the apartment complex--they did not move her in or you out. The complex had nothing to do with this. This is something you need to resolve with your roommates--the ones who forced you out. You could potentially sue the roommates for the last 10 days of your share of rent, on the grounds they wrongfully interefered with a contract--your lease. But whether it is worth it to sue people in TX from AZ over 10 days of rent is highly questionable.


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