Can my parents leave me out of their will?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can my parents leave me out of their will?

I am the single parent of 3 children. One of them has autism. In my family, I am the oldest child. From day one, my father has not liked me. I have one younger sister and brother. Currently, my sister is on probation. She has been in and out of jail for drug offenses such as forgery and theft for most of her adult life. Yet, my father bought her a 300,000 home outright and pays all her expenses. She is 46 and never has had a job. My brother has been in and out of work his adult life. Whenever he is down on his luck, my father sends him money. Recently, he gave my brother’s wife 40,000 to pay off her student loans. I received no financial help from my Dad at all. However, my parents claim I owe them for taking my autistic daughter to school so that I could ‘work’. I am 53 years old and have been steadily employed since age 18. I put myself through college. They never even gave me a wedding my husband’s parents paid for it. Now, I found out they are leaving me out of the will. My sister is inheriting the money and my brother is getting the house. Meanwhile, I have cancer, and am losing money fast. They chide me for instead for having inadequate healthcare not understanding their are copays and deductibles that need to be met. Are they allowed to disinherit me? If there anything I can do?

Asked on May 12, 2017 under Estate Planning, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

A parent may disinherit a child, as children have no automatic right to inherit from their parents. While most states do have laws to protect against accidental disinheritance, absent such a circumstance (which does not apply in this case), if there is a Will and you're not named in it, you are not entitled to anything. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption