Can my old employer file criminal charges almost a year later ifI stop paying what they sayI owe them?

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Can my old employer file criminal charges almost a year later ifI stop paying what they sayI owe them?

I was fired from my job because they said they had video proof of me stealing money, however they didn’t press charges. It wasn’t directly stealing money, they said it was charging the wrong amount for haircuts and pocketing the difference. They made me sign a paper saying I would pay them $3,000. There were 2 other employees that they did the same thing as well. I am the only one that has been paying them back. If I were to stop paying, can they press charges now? I was fired 11 months ago

Asked on December 9, 2011 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Your former employer could file charges against you if you stopped paying on the promissory note that you signed concerning the $3,000 that you allegedly stole. Whether the district attorney's office will file criminal charges as to you stemming essentially from a civil action at this point remains to be seen.

Based upon my experience, the district attorney's office does not like to get involved in matters that are essentially civil in nature which is what your matter is now.

It is illegal in all states to use a criminal proceeding to gain an advantage in a civil matter.


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