Can my lease with option to buy Lessor refuse to sell the house to me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can my lease with option to buy Lessor refuse to sell the house to me?

I have live in the house I’m buying since 2013. I purchased the home as a residential lease with option to purchase agreement. I purchased the house for $48,000. Currently the house has appreciated to$ 65,000. The contract also came with a amortization schedule. Recently, I decided to sell the house and move on. I contacted the Lessor and informed him of my plans. He was fine with it and wanted off the note anyway. I currently owe as the amortization schedule reads – 35718. Now the Lessor found out about this and is sore over the difference. Now he is demanding $45,000 or he won’t sell. Is this possible or should I just pursue this in court?

Asked on July 2, 2019 under Real Estate Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

Assuming you are in full compliance with the contract (a lease is a contract), then the lessor must sell it to you as per the contract. He can neither refuse to sell nor ask for more money than the contract itself provided for. You could bring a lawsuit in county court for a court order forcing him to sell; you have to decide for yourself whether it is worthwhile for you to do this and you are willing go to through with litigation, or if you'd rather either pay his demand amount or else try to settle with him somewhere in the middle.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption