Can my landlord enter my apartment without notifying me?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can my landlord enter my apartment without notifying me?

Today I noticed some things missing from my apartment (my husband’s prescription medicine and soda) When I called the management company I was informed that they had “checked out” our key to a pest control vendor over the weekend. They tried to reassure me by telling me that the vendor was bonded and insured, and that they’d never had this problem before. Aren’t they required to notify me in writing or otherwise that someone will be entering my home? What rights do I have to avoid this in the future?

Asked on July 18, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Maryland

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

In MD, a landlord must give "reasonable" to enter a tenant's premises. This has been defined as a minimum 24 hours, more if feasible. And without notice if the is tenant present and agrees. Additionally, the days and time of entry must be during normal business hours (8:00 a. to 6:00 pm, M – F) unless the tenant agrees otherwise. So as long as such notice is given, there can be entry without consent. Reasons for entry include: to perform necessary or agreed on repairs, alterations, or redecoration or to exhibit property to potential tenants, buyers, workmen, mortgagees, etc. 

Note: In the event of an emergency, where providing notice is impractical, a landlord has the right of entry into a tenant's premises and without notice. 


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption