Can my landlord force me to get renters insurance with them documented as an interested party?

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Can my landlord force me to get renters insurance with them documented as an interested party?

The management office has stipulated a new requirement for re-signing your lease. A minimum $100,000/per occurrence renter’s insurance policy with the landlord noted as an interested party. I am of the impression the landlord is responsible for the insurance on their property and any renter’s insurance I obtain would be in the amount of my choosing to cover the cost of my property or as protection if a guest injures themselves while in my apartment. Is there a FL law I can refer to that supports me, or do they have the right to make this requirement?

Asked on January 10, 2011 under Real Estate Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

They do have a right to make this requirement. If you don't like it--and I can understand why--you can rent elsewhere. However, as a general rule, a landlord may require anything that is not specifically prohibited by law or is not applied in a discriminatory (e.g. vs a race, religion, sex, age over 40, disability status) fashion, and requiring insurance is not specifically prohibited. It makes sense, too--if you do something which causes damage to the landlord's property or interests, why shouldn't the landlord collect from your insurance? It's like a homeowner requiring that a contractor provide proof of insurance before hiring them--in the event of a problem, the homeowner would rather collect from the contractor's insurance (and make sure there  is coverage) than his or her own.


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