Can my ex stop paying alimony if I remarry?

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Can my ex stop paying alimony if I remarry?

There are no stipulation in the divorce decree that I must remain single to get alimony.

Asked on December 10, 2011 under Family Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Thank you for submitting your question regarding alimony payments and what happens to those alimony payments in the case of remarriage.  As with all family law matters, the laws governing alimony and spousal support will vary from state to state.  When a state determines how long alimony and spousal support will continue, the court will often look at the purpose of the support, which is maintenance of a former spouse.   The termination of alimony can occur upon remarriage of the recipient, cohabitation of the recipient with a member of the opposite sex who is a not a family member, or death of either party.

Even though your divorce decree does not state that your alimony will terminate when you remarry, you need to think what the court will analyze when considering whether or not your ex will need to continue to pay if you decide to remarry.  What exactly would your ex be paying for?  Would your new spouse not be responsible for paying for your mortgage and groceries and support?  If you got divorced again, would both men be expected to pay for your support? 

Since the laws for alimony can vary from state to state and you may be concerned with losing these payments, you may want to consult with a family law attorney in your area to get a better understand on the laws of your state to see what would happen if you did in fact remarry.  The costs of consulting with an attorney may save you some money in the long run.

 


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