Can my college raise my tuition without my knowledge?

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Can my college raise my tuition without my knowledge?

My profit college raised tuition without notice. I must now pay a lump sum or payments over the next 3 months that I cannot pay or they will not allow me to start an externship for my program. If I miss a payment, I will be physically removed from my externship. I have to complete this externship in order to complete my program and graduate. I do not pay per credit hour, it was a total program price I agreed to pay. Can they do this? What are my options? I am out of work; my husband is out of work; we have no income. I can’t afford this.

Asked on September 18, 2010 under Business Law, Florida

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Do you have a tuition agreement in writing?  What does it say?  Does it say that it is a flat rate fee for the program or that it is subject to a rate increase?  Does it say anything about charging extra for the externship maybe?  You have to read it carefully. And jot down notes and page numbers.  Once you have that I would contact the Florida Department of Education.  Here is the link: http://www.fldoe.org.  And the number:  Phone: (850) 245-0505.  They will help to guide you with your degree being held hostage, so to speak.  They may even be able to help work out a more reasonable payment plan should you be liable for the extra tuition. Good luck.


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