Can my brother or mother sue his ex -fiance for the money paid for things for the wedding that she called off?

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Can my brother or mother sue his ex -fiance for the money paid for things for the wedding that she called off?

Deposits were made for limo service, flowers, gowns, makeup, photographer that he cannot get back. They were to be married in September and she called the wedding off in June.

Asked on August 17, 2011 New York

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Your brother and mother could file a lawsuit against the woman that was to be a member of your family since that is a right that all people in this country have. The issue is whether or not there will be liability and damages established because the woman who was to marry your brother called off the date.

It is always foreseeable that an engagement may not result in a marriage. Money was expended for the wedding that did not result by many who were not even the bride or groom.

In your situation, I view the chances of being successful in such a lawsuit as being quite remote. From a practical matter, even though there are hurt feelings that the marriage did not occur, is it not better in the long run that it did not happen given that entering into a marriage having second thoughts most likely would have resulted in a divorce?

You never hear about people suing a divorced couple for expenditures made for their wedding after it does not work out. I do not see much a difference where the wedding never materializes but some expenditures for its preparation are made.

Good question.


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