Can my boss require me to sign a work order that I don’t think I should sign?

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Can my boss require me to sign a work order that I don’t think I should sign?

I’m curious if my boss can make me sign a work order (from a contractor) that states “work was performed and complete to your satisfaction” when it is not possible to know if in fact the work the contractors did is complete and to my satisfaction? They performed electrical work on a big street sign, and I will not be able to tell if the work they did is complete and to my satisfaction until it gets dark. Also, part of the problem was the electrical breaker blowing and I don’t feel it is possible to know for sure the problem is fixed until the breaker doesn’t give us any problems for a couple of days.

Asked on April 8, 2011 under Employment Labor Law, Texas

Answers:

MD, Member, California Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

No, your boss should be the one to sign such a document since it is your boss who has more of an interest in the work than you do and he or she is the supervisor. Further, those work order sign offs are to protect the party doing the work. So if someone signs it and the work is still not complete or done improperly, then you may have put yourself, your boss or the company in a situation to pay out of pocket for additional repairs and preclude any liability on the part of the electrician actually doing the work. The best thing to do at this point is to discuss the matter with your boss and suggest how the company can test it out with the electrician there to enable everyone to witness the same thing and be on the same page.


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