Can my boss make me go in for 2 days of training without paying me?

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Can my boss make me go in for 2 days of training without paying me?

I just got this job as a fry cook at a gas station in Kaplan Louisiana and my boss straight up told me you have to come in for 2 days to train but I don’t pay you to train now I’m working in a kitchen with tile floor and just that by itself is slippery on top of that the fryer I cook in leaks so I had to mop at least 4 times last night I almost fell 10 times now I’m actually doing work so god forbid if I fall are get burned who will be responsible me are him and is that legal for him to make us work without pa

Asked on February 18, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Louisiana

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You have 2 issues here - payment for your time and possible injury at your workplace. As to the first, any time that you are required to perfom work duties, then you must be compensated, whether such time is for "training or not. As to the second issue, if you are injured at work, then your employer would be liable; unsafe working conditions of which it is aware would consutute negligence. 

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

1) Mandatory training (training required by your employer) is considered work, since it is something your employer requires you to do for its benefit. You must be paid for it, like for any other work.
2) If you are injured due to unsafe conditions at work which your employer is or logically should be aware of, your employer would most likely be liable. The issue is whether the condition is one that would be considered unreasonably dangerous.


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