Can an insurance company raise their insured’s rates because of 2car accidents, if neither of which was the insured’s fault?

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Can an insurance company raise their insured’s rates because of 2car accidents, if neither of which was the insured’s fault?

The police reports and claims adjusters show that the insured wasn’t at fault.

Asked on August 10, 2011 Kentucky

Answers:

L.P., Member, Pennsylvania and New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Much of what your insurance company is permitted to do can be found somewhere in your insurance policy.  While this is a lengthy, and often difficult, document to read and comprehend, the fine print usually contains all of the answers.  However, generally, an insurance company is not permitted to raise your premiums due to a no-fault accident.  Sometimes if you have multiple no-fault accidents during a one-year time frame the insurance company may ask to increase your deductible, but cannot raise your premium.

 

With that being said, this does not mean that your premium will be the same from one year to the next if you do not have any at-fault accidents.  The insurance company is permitted to raise premiums to make up for other lost costs, such as paying out for hurricane recovery. 

 

You should talk with your insurance advisor to get a better understanding as to why your premiums were raised.  Although it may seem to you that they are attempting to recover the money they paid out for your two no-fault accidents, they will more than likely state that your premiums have been raised for a completely unrelated reason.  If you do not like the response you receive from your insurance company, you can contact your state’s insurance commissioner and hope that they take action to regulate this type of behavior.

 


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