Can I sue Wall Associates?

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Can I sue Wall Associates?

I recently hired Wall Associates to help me with a tax
issue. The Sales person initially convince me that they
could help resolve my issue in less than 6 months after
paying a lot of money to the firm for 2 years they were not
able to resolve my tax issue. Eventually i hired a local tax
person who was able to get an arrangement for me. Later I
did find out from the BBB that so many customers were
duped by the firm as well. The state sued the firm after
contacting me for information but I’m not sure what is going
on or what happened to the case. Can I or group of
customers that I have been duped by Wall Associates sue
the firm to recover some or all money paid or it would be a
waste of money and time? If so how do I or we go after the
firm?

Asked on July 14, 2018 under Business Law, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You could sue them for fraud, if they lied to you about what they could do or would do, or about their resources or expertise. You could sue them for breach of contract if they agreed in writing to do certain things (e.g. resolve the issue within a certain time frame) and failed to do so. You could potentially sue for the return of what you paid and for any additional fees, fines, or interests you ended up owing the IRS due to their delay. If the amount is less than the limit for small claims, it would likely make sense to sue in small claims as your own attorney ("pro se"), since the cost of a lawyer would substantially eat into and possibly exceed what you would recover. If the amount is greater than the small claims limit, consult with an attorney.


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