Can I sue the electrician who inspected our electrical box 3.5 years ago when an electrician today says it was/is in unsellable condition?

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Can I sue the electrician who inspected our electrical box 3.5 years ago when an electrician today says it was/is in unsellable condition?

My husband and I bought an older house almost 4 years ago. It had an old fuse box but was inspected and passed by a licensed electrician. We have always had issues with our electric having blown fuses and having to replace those fuses. Starting about 2 months ago some appliances started blowing and our lights started dimming when others were in use. We had another electrician come do an estimate after suspicions we had of needed the house rewired. This electrician said our home should have never passed inspection as it was not even up to 1970’s codes. We want to sue for cost of repairs and cost of moving as we have has to move out of our hazardous home. We even have a special needs child and this move is very stressful for him. Do we sue for negligence? Are there any president cases to present to a lawyer when asking him to take our case?

Asked on February 22, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Georgia

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

The issue that I see is was the home up to code when the fuse box that was in place installed? Items may not be up to code presently but are grandfathered in due to the age of the home and are required to be replaced when the home is remodeled. I suggest that you consult with the local building and permit department to see if the fuse box was permited when you purchased the home or needed to be replaced at that time.

The measue of damages assuming you have a basis for bringing suit against the prior electrician would be for the costs of a new electrical box at the time when you purchased the home. Under the law you do not get move out expenses assuming you can establish liability against the prior electrician.


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