Can i sue someone for burning me with food?

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Can i sue someone for burning me with food?

Ok, so i work at mcdonalds in my town and i was working yesterday with a guy
called, well, lets just call him mike. So mike is this annoying prick that no one
that works with me likes. Yesterday evening i was working and minding my own
business when mike decides, ‘you know what? lets just see if this hurts.’ So with
his intelligence, he just grabs a McChicken that had just been pulled out of the
fryer and came over to me with it and tore it in half and held it up against my
arm for a good 5 seconds and left me with 2nd degree burns on my arm. I was
wondering if since hes 17 and im 16 if i would be able to sue him for assualt or
some other sort of personal injury offense?

Asked on May 15, 2017 under Personal Injury, Missouri

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

There's most likely no point in suing: in a lawsuit, you can only recover an amount of money equivalent to your out-of-pocket medical bills, lost wages due to the injury, if any, and--IF you suffered *serious*, long-lasting impairment or disability--an amount for pain and suffering...but to possibly recover pain and suffering, you'd need to hire a doctor to testify, and you can't get the cost of hiring the doctor back in the lawsuit (it's your cost). So in a case like this, you could only get the medical costs and wages for any work you missed, and *possibly*, if you suffer a signficant lasting effect from a 2nd-degree burn on your arm (which is unlikely) a few hundred dollars or so for pain and suffering--but would have to pay several hundred dollars or more for the medical testimony. In other words, you will spend more on this lawsuit than you will get back.
You could file a police report and inquire into pressing charges.


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