Can I sue my former company for slander for holding a meeting and telling the employees why I was let go?

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Can I sue my former company for slander for holding a meeting and telling the employees why I was let go?

The day after I was terminated, the Operations Manager held a meeting with the plant employees and told the that I was terminated and why they did this. Can I sue them for slandering my name?

Asked on January 25, 2012 under Business Law, Texas

Answers:

Joseph Gasparrini

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

Based on what you stated in your question, it is unlikely in the extreme that you have a valid cause of action on which you could recover damages from your former employer.  There are enormous hurdles to a libel or slander suit in this type of situation.  Although the law varies somewhat among the states, in general there will be no valid claim for recovery unless the other party intentionally made false statements about you; these false statements about you were sufficiently severe and were spread widely enough among the public that your reputation was actually damaged, and that you sufferred serious harm or losses as a result.  In addition to having a case and a set of facts that will satisfy these legal requirements, it would typically cost a great deal in legal fees in order to hire competent counsel who is appropriately specialized in this area, and to prove all of the relevant facts in court.


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