Can I sue my employer for breach of contract?

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Can I sue my employer for breach of contract?

In my contract I was to have a company expense
card and one hasnt been provided. I have been
made to travel for work on my dime and be
reimbursed. Sometimes taking a month to get repaid.

Also i was to have 150,000 worth of life insurance
company paid and never have received this
coverage and its stressful for me and my family as I
take risk daily traveling for work that I normally
wouldnt take.

My family has really been put out by this and my
company doesnt seem to truly care and pretty much
tell me it is what it is.

Asked on June 16, 2019 under Employment Labor Law, Tennessee

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 1 year ago | Contributor

If you actually had a written employment contract (not merely an offer letter, which is not enforceable) for a set or defined period of time, such as a one-year, two-year, etc. contact commencing on a given date (since it requires a set contractual period to overcome the fact that otherwise an employer can change the terms, compensation, benefits, etc. of a job at any time, for any reason, and renege on previous but noncontractual promises), you can enforce the terms of that contract--including sueing for "breach" (or violation) of contract to get compensation (e.g. the value of what you were deprived of; or the amount you spent to provide yourself something which the employer was contractually supposed to provide you). So if you do in fact have a written employment contract, then yes, you can sue your employer.


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