Can I sue my employer for wrongful termination?

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Can I sue my employer for wrongful termination?

I was fired for asking my supervisor why I had to move against the wall and because I was laughing in the breakroom. A Spanish speaking customer said that I cursed her out. My supervisor knew that was false and I asked to be shown it on camera. They then said I was fired because of what I already stated. It’s a hostile environment to work. If you’re black you’re treated differently. Black workers have been wrongfully terminated. I had to contact HR months prior to this because of the discriminatory practices here at Wendy’s. They fired another black guy saying that I called him to the

breakroom, which I didn’t. I asked to see this on the tape but they refused. What can I do about this?

Asked on March 12, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, New York

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Normally, an employer may terminate an employee at any time, for any reason because the law in this country is "employment at will." However, there are some limitations, and one is that no employer may discriminate against an employee due to his or her race: while a minority employee may be treated differently or even terminated, it must be because of some reason *other than* race (like documented peformance; degrees or credentials; etc.). If there is no valid reason other than race for the treatment, this may be a violation of the law. 
If you think that there is no valid reason for this treatment apart from your race, you should contact the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) or you state's equal/civil rights agency about filing a complaint.


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