Can I Sue my Company

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Can I Sue my Company

I currently work for an aviation company that does fueling services. The company was bought out and with that taking place we were forced to move break rooms. Our old break room with the old company met all the requirements set by OSHA but the new one does not. We don’t have access to drinking water (although we primarily work in outside weather conditions), our first aid kit is outdated, and we

don’t have access to our own restrooms. Along with that, things outlined in our union agreement we don’t have access to such as showering stations and hearing protection. Can I sue?

Asked on March 8, 2018 under Employment Labor Law, Georgia

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

Unless you personally suffered an injury or illness you have no cause of action, so you can not sue over your working conditions. That having been said, you do have the right to report your these conditons to OSHA to see if they constitute a violation of its standards. Additionally, you may have rights regarding this situation under the terms of an employment contract or union agreement, if applicable.

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 3 years ago | Contributor

You cannot personally sue unless you suffered some injury or illness due to the lack of property working conditions: lawsuits are not designed to enforce the laws, but rather to provide compensation for harm done or costs incurred. You can report OSHA violations to OSHA, which may take enforcement action; your union can also look to enforce the terms of the union contract.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

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