Can I sue a car repair shop for the damage done to my car?

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Can I sue a car repair shop for the damage done to my car?

I paid for about a $500 for a clutch job. I received a 6 month warranty on it. Then, no more than about a month later, my transmission began to act up. I took it to a transmission repair shop because that is the closest shop and I was literally unable to move the car without risking my life. They told me that whoever put in my new clutch didn’t know what they were doing and as a result they messed up my transmission. I now have to front $1,700 to fix my car because of the poor clutch job done, am I able to sue for both the cost of my car and the cost of transportation due to not having a car for about 2 weeks?

Asked on May 8, 2017 under Business Law, Florida

Answers:

SJZ, Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 4 years ago | Contributor

Yes, if someone damages your car through negligence, or unreasonable carelessness, like a bad repair, you can sue them for the costs resulting therefrom: e.g. for the cost to repair, any towing costs, renting  a car (or taking a bus, etc.) while yours is in the shop, etc. For trial (assuming it does not settle by a voluntary payment ahead of trial), you would need expert testimony (e.g. from a technician at the second shop, who has examined or worked on your car) as to how the first "repair" was faulty and caused damage; the technician/expert would have to appear in court and testify in person.


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