Can I sue a debt collector for impersonating court house officials in order to get me to pay a credit card debt from like 3 years ago?

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Can I sue a debt collector for impersonating court house officials in order to get me to pay a credit card debt from like 3 years ago?

I have 2 messages that I saved from about 4 months ago. The lady on the message said that she was with the county clerk’s office and said that she had paperword that was going to be served to me as I was being sued. She then said that my attorney or I could can call an 800 number. I called the county courthouse and they had no idea what I was talking about. I then called the 800 number and reached the litigation department of a debt collection agency. They tried to get me to pay them money, by threats of all kinds of legal action.

Asked on September 13, 2011 under Bankruptcy Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

In all states in this country there are laws against unfair debt collection practices by third party collection companies that you had the misfortune to have dealt with. There is also a federal statute as well on the subject.

If you want to press the issue with the third party debt collection company that threatened legal action against you if you did not pay the alleged debt owed as well as made misrepresentations that its representative was with the county clerk's office, you might want to consult with an attorney experienced in unfair debt collection practices to ascertain the viability of filing a legal action based upon your state's unfair debt collection practices laws and the facts that you have written about.

Good luck.


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