Can I sell a house “as is”?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I sell a house “as is”?

I need to sell a house and I don’t want to put out any money in fixing it up . Can I sell it “as is”. Do I need to tell the buyer anything about the house? I did have a certified real estate appraiser give me what the value of the house is worth and all problems that he saw and that would need to be fixed if the house was to be bank financed. For bank financing the entrance panel needed to be upgraded to a breaker box. There is currently the old style fuse box. Should I supply the certified appraisal to anyone interested in the house or let them purchase the house without giving any info at all?

Asked on April 18, 2012 under Real Estate Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

M.T.G., Member, New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

Generally speaking a party always sells a house "as is" and hopefully prices the house accordingly.  When there are unforseen issues that arise then parties tend to negotiate the price or have the option to fix at the sellers expense or void the contract.  I would speak with an attorney and discuss pricing the house at the value if most things were fixed leaving you room to negotiate the rest down.  Some states do have mandatory disclosure statements such as for lead paint so those things need to be disclosed. Insist on an inspection so that everything is out in the open and there is nothing you could be accused of hiding that could cause you liability later.  Good luck.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption