Can i press charges?.

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can i press charges?.

I was living with a friend and some stuff went down and i moved out. We had a agreement that i could leave my stuff there intill i get a place. We were in a verbal battel over the computer. I call her to see where my stuff was and she threw it out. I had my cyber scholling books and printer there plus tv dvd player a brand new bed, my decest mother dressers brand new wasser and dryers and verious of stuff. Her own family told me she probley still has the stuff. What can i do?

Asked on May 28, 2009 under Criminal Law, Pennsylvania

Answers:

B. B., Member, New Jersey Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 12 years ago | Contributor

I don't know if criminal charges would be appropriate, but I'm fairly sure that you could sue for the value of what you never got back.

The law calls it a "bailment," when one person has possession of things that belong to another person, temporarily and with the owner's permission.  The law varies from one state to the next, and sometimes depends in part on whether the person with possession of the things is gaining a benefit, either from the possession itself (a borrowed car) or from a fee being gained for the possession (a parking garage).

Of course, what will matter in court is what you can prove.

You should talk to a lawyer in your area about this, for advice based on Pennsylvania law.  Make an inventory (list) of everthing that was left there, the value, and how you can prove it was there, it was yours and and what it was worth.  One place you can look for the attorney you need is our website, http://attorneypages.com


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption