Can I get warrants dropped if I’m mentally retarded?

Get Legal Help Today

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption

Can I get warrants dropped if I’m mentally retarded?

Asked on February 19, 2013 under Criminal Law, Texas

Answers:

B.H.F., Member, Texas State Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 8 years ago | Contributor

You can't get a warrant automatically dropped just because you are mentally retarded.  However, your mental status can affect other things.  First, if/when you are arrested on the charges, it would be a basis for the judge releasing you on a low surety bond or on a personal bond while the charges are pending.  Second, your mental abilities could also have an impact on your eventual guilt or innocence.  If you did not have the mental ability to understand your actions, you could plead non-guilty by reason of insanity.  If the court determines that you were sane, they can still consider your mental difficulties as mitigating evidence to justify punishing you less than a regular offender. 

If you believe that you are not guilty of the charges for which the warrant has been issued because you didn't have the mental ability to commit the offense, then you need to find a criminal defense attorney to help you.  Do not talk to the police on your own.  Instead, let the criminal defense attorney communicate some of your information.  If the officer investigating your case decides that you did not have the mental state to commit the offense, then they can make the decision to pull the warrant.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: The Answer(s) provided above are for general information only. The attorney providing the answer was not serving as the attorney for the person submitting the question or in any attorney-client relationship with such person. Laws may vary from state to state, and sometimes change. Tiny variations in the facts, or a fact not set forth in a question, often can change a legal outcome or an attorney's conclusion. Although AttorneyPages.com has verified the attorney was admitted to practice law in at least one jurisdiction, he or she may not be authorized to practice law in the jurisdiction referred to in the question, nor is he or she necessarily experienced in the area of the law involved. Unlike the information in the Answer(s) above, upon which you should NOT rely, for personal advice you can rely upon we suggest you retain an attorney to represent you.

Get Legal Help Today

Find the right lawyer for your legal issue.

 Secured with SHA-256 Encryption