Can I get unemployment if I was just absent and tardy2 times?

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Can I get unemployment if I was just absent and tardy2 times?

I work for a national retail chain and was recently let go because of 2 absences and 2 tardies within a 90 day period. The policy states that if a team member is going to be late, they must contact the supervisor 2 hours before the shift starts. The problem with that is my shift starts at 4am. No one is in the store until 3:30am and I did call on one occasion. Another time, when I knew beyond a doubt I wouldn’t make my shift because I was sick was the afternoon/evening before my next shift. The tardies were 5-7 minutes late due to early morning construction. I am wondering if I can get unemployment in NC

Asked on July 27, 2011 North Carolina

Answers:

M.D., Member, California and New York Bar / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

A

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 10 years ago | Contributor

If you were terminated from your employment by your employer for being late and having absences, there is a good chance that you would be entitled to collect unemployment benefits after you make an application for such. Your former employer may oppose the request and then there would be a hearing as to the entitlement for such unemployment benefits.

Most states preclude unemployment benefits if the employee was discharged for certain wrongful acts such as theft, forgery, purposeful and repeated failure to follow office protocol and harassment.

You should go apply for unemployment benefits and then see what the outcome is. You might want to meet with someone with the umeployment benefits office to ask further questions before you submit your application.

Good luck.


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