Can I get someone removed as trustee without hiring a lawyer?

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Can I get someone removed as trustee without hiring a lawyer?

My sister and a family friend were named as trustees of my estranged father’s estate. The family friend has unofficially bowed out leaving her to act on her own. Apparently he’s signed some blank checks so he won’t have to deal with it anymore. She has been unable to work (emotionally unstable) for several years and apparently she has spent all of her money (which she wasn’t to get for several more years) and is now after mine. I agreed to “lend” her about 12K over the last year which was supposed to be paid back when she sold her house. Her house has not been sold. And last time she asked for more I told her no and she went ballistic. I don’t get my share until age 55. I’m on disability and don’t have the money to hire a lawyer. She and I live in other states. Is there anything I can do?

Asked on February 11, 2012 under Estate Planning, Washington

Answers:

FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney / FreeAdvice Contributing Attorney

Answered 9 years ago | Contributor

If you sister is a trustee under the trust that you are writing about and she will be acting as the sole trustee causing you concern, you could file a petition on your own seeking to have her removed as the trustee under the trust for specificed reasons under the law of the state you live in.

You can go to your county law library and do some legal research for the filing of the requested petition where you need not employ a lawyer to do what you want done. The law librarian can help direct you as how to do things. Your county might also have a legal aid program to help you as well for no charge.


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